Dahlia!

My Grandma Gladys (and my mom) taught me all about gardening.  Grandma’s Dahlias won many ribbons and every year I was amazed by the rows of these beauties growing in her garden.  Oddly, when my grandmother passed away in the Fall of 1973, her Dahlias never came up again; gone!  We always said, “she took them to heaven with her!”

I always plant them in my garden and couldn’t wait to add them to my Garden Notes collection.  The colors are so brilliant and the varieties are numerous and your projects, whether they’re cards, tags, or on top of a gift box will definitely put a smile on the recipient’s face.

LET’S GET STARTED

Step One

Die cut two (2) of all the petal pieces and (1) for the center in white 85 lb. (230g) cardstock.  I also die cut two (2) stems–one in 85 lb. (230g) and one in 100 lb. (270g) cardstock as shown.  For the leaves, you can die cut 3 to 4 as desired.

Step Two

For the variegated variety, I colored the white petals, haphazardly, in the desired Copic alcohol pen. As you can see, there’s no “rhyme or reason” with the coloring and I do color the underside as well.

Use Beacon Zip Dry glue to adhere the two stems together for each flower and glue it right on my project.  (Remember, all Garden Notes flowers are constructed directly on your project.)

Step Three

Place the largest petal on the Molding Pad, right-side down and use the Loop Tool to shape it.  Then, use the tweezers to pinch each individual petals, as shown.

Place the “pinched” petal on the Molding Mat again and use the Medium Ball Stylus to stir the shape.

Add some Beacon kids choice glue! with a toothpick to the underside and adhere it to the top of the stem.

Step Four

To build the flower, you will repeat the steps above, graduating in size the petals for the next 7 flower pieces. It’s important to off-set the pieces as you build up the flower!

Step Five

For the last two small flowers, place them right-side down on a firm surface, i.e., rubber eraser, and use the Leaf Tool to stem each individual petal.

Finally, place this small flower, right-side up on the Molding Pad and use the Small Ball Stylus to cup the shape.

Use a toothpick to add a small amount of glue to the underneath, center of the flower and adhere in place.  Repeat with the last flower.

Step Six

The center of the flower is created by applying a small amount of glue to the straight edge of the piece while holding the “tail” with the tweezers.  Then, roll up the shape, flare out the filaments with your fingers, dip the bottom into the glue and adhere to the center of the flower.

Now, all you have to do is add the leaves!  I shaded the leaves, when I did the stem, with Distress Ink/Forest Moss, then, place them right-side down on the Leaf Pad and use the Leaf Tool to add a stem line down the center.  Turn the leaf over and bend it up.  Apply PanPastel/Bright Yellow Green down the center.  Next, place the leaf, right-side up back on the Leaf Pad and use the Leaf Tool to add veins on either side of the stem line.  Pinch the stem of the leaf and turn it right-side down, placing it at a 45-degree angle on the Leaf Pad and use the Medium Ball Stylus to shape the end of the leaf.  Dip the stem end into the glue and adhere under the flowers.

That’s all there is to it.  Have fun with this flower that brings back such great memories for me!

Elizabeth Craft Designs Products

Susan’s Garden/Garden Notes Dahlia #1368

Tuberous Begonia

Tuberous Begonias are one of my favorite “potted plants”;  I always include them for a dramatic pop of color in my pots on my porch.  It’s also one of my new Garden Notes flowers that was released in June and is now available.  I wanted to step out the direction so you can get started with adding these beauties to your garden.

These red Begonias enhance the beauty of the Caladiums in my front porch urns.

LET’S GET STARTED

Step One

I die cut the four pieces of the flower twice using Soft Finish White 85 lb. cardstock.  I also die cut two stems; one in medium green 80 lb cardstock and one in a lighter green 100 lb. cardstock.

I colored all the petals with Copic R29, front and back, and I used some Beacon Zip Dry glue to adhere the two stems together. Then, glue the stem directly onto your project.  This is the beauty of Garden Notes–they are constructed right on your cards!

 

Step Two

Place the one of the large 5-petal flowers on the Molding Pad, right-side down, and use the Loop Tool to Shape each petal as shown.  Next, use the tweezers to Pinch in the stem area, holding that pinch with your thumb and index finger, and using the tweezers to Bend down the petals.

Use a toothpick to apply a small amount of glue to the underside center and adhere to the top of the stem.

Repeat these techniques with the second large 5-petal flower; adhering it on top of the first flower, but slightly askew.

Step Three

Place the “fan-shaped petal” on the Molding Pad and use the Loop Tool to shape it. Use the tweezers to Pinch the stem end.  Use your thumb and index finger to hold this pinching while you use the tweezers to Bend the outer edges of this petal.  Repeat with the second petal.  Insert these two fan-shaped petals between the petals of the flower.

Step Four

Place the 4-petal flower on the Molding Pad and use the Loop Tool to Shape it as shown. Next, use the small ball stylus to Cup the shape. Add a small amount of glue to the bottom and adhere it to the center of the flower.

Repeat with the second 4-petal flower, placing it inside the first.

Step Five

Finally, the last two petals are placed on the Molding Pad, using the Loop Tool, Shape, Pinch, and Bend. Lightly dip the stem end into the glue and adhere them around the 4-petal center.


Step Six

Leaves are shaded on the edges with Distress Ink, then place right-side down on the Leaf Pad and using the Leaf Tool, draw a Stem down the center.  Fold the leaf in half, right-side facing you, and use PanPastels and a cosmetic sponge to shade the stem line.  Place the Leaf back on the Leaf Pad and use the Leaf Tool to draw Vein lines on either side of the stem. For a little more shape, pinch the stem line with your thumb and index finger, place the leaf face down on the Molding Pad, and use the Medium Ball Stylus to shape the tip by pushing down and back.

Dip the stem end into the glue and add leaves underneath the flower.

Here’s a couple more examples of using Begonias in your projects:  A card with a Tea Cup-full and a Music Box between some of my Dahlias.

Elizabeth Craft Designs Supplies

Susan’s Garden/Garden Notes-Tuberous Begonia (#1374)

Tool Kit, Molding Pad, Leaf Pad

Soft Finish Cardstock/White 85 lb.

Beacon Kids Choice Glue

PanPastels/Set 1

Other Supplies

Copic Marker R29

Ranger Distress Ink/Forest Moss

 

By Request…

A few weeks ago I posted this card on FaceBook and had wonderful responses.  In particular, Babs asked if I could explain how I put this together.  As I have told everyone, I’m always happy to share my paper gardening tips and techniques so you can create beautiful flowers and bouquets.

 

LET’S GET STARTED

Step One

I trimmed a 12″ x 12″ sheet of Colored Soft Finish Cardstock (Perfect Purple) into a 6″ x 6″ folded card.  For the next layer, I used Soft Finish White (230g/85 lb) and trimmed it to a 5 1/2″ x 5 1/2″ square.  Finally, I used Els van de Burgt Studio “Dotted Scallop/Square” die to cut a 3 1/2″ x 3 1/2″ square from the Soft Finish White cardstock that I used Distress Oxide Ink on.

 That creates your “base” for the nosegay of Pansies.

Step Two

To create the nosegay holder, I used ModaScrap’s “Oriental Corner.”  First, cut it in half, then fold along scored lines.  Add clear-double-sided

 

Step Three

I wanted the look of stems showing in the nosegay, so I die cut three of my Garden Notes “Bouquet Stems & Branches” in a medium green cardstock. I use a bit of clear double-sided tape on the underside of the Stems and adhered them in place.

Step Four

To give dimension to the bouquet, I used a technique of making a “dome” so I wouldn’t have to place flowers on top of each other.  To do this, I die cut a small oval (from Els van de Burgt Studio “Fitted Ovals) twice; one in the medium green cardstock I used for the Stems and one in a lighter green (so you could see I cut it twice!)  Place the lighter green piece on the Molding Pad and use the Large Ball Stylus (from my toolkit) to stir the shape and give it dimension.

Use a toothpick and apply glue to the outside of the shape ONLY!  As I’ve said before, glue tends to shrink when it dries and if you applied glue to the center, it will pull your dimension down and defeat the purpose of creating a dome.

Place the light green oval on the center Stems.

Repeat these steps for the medium green oval, setting it on top of the light green oval.

Step Five

The last step before I started making the Pansies, was to tuck in some of Els “Leafy branches in the top.  I cut the branch in half (at a point where it was obvious to cut), and created a stem-line, using my Leaf Tool.

I also added my Garden Notes Ivy Vine once the Pansies were done.  I die cut them in the Soft Finish White cardstock and colored them using Copic Markers (YG91, YG93).

Since I have made Pansies, several times on my blog, I’m going to refer you to a post I did on February 10, 2016–“Egg-trodinary Spring Bouquet” to see how I create my natural-looking flowers.

I hope this helps you to understand how this card was put together.  Have fun making nosegays!

Elizabeth Craft Designs Supplies

Susan Tierney-Cockburn/Garden Notes

Bouquet Stems & Branches (#1190)

Ivy Vine (#1297)

Pansy (#1089)

Tool Kit (#808), Molding Pad (#809) and Leaf Pad (#811)

Els van de Burgt Studio

Leafy Branch (#1033)

Fitted Ovals (#1114)

Dotted Scallop Squares (#1175)

ModaScrap

Oriental Corner (#1386)

Colored Soft Finish Cardstock/Perfect Purple (#PSF 126)

Soft Finish Cardstock/White 230g/85 lb. (PSF101)

Clear Double Sided Tape –6mm (#506) and 3mm (#505)

Beacon Kids Choice Glue

Prills

 

Other Supplies

Ranger Distress Oxide Ink/Wilted Violet and Peeled Paint

Copic Markers (Pansies V09, V15), (Ivy Vine YG91, YG93)